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Bill’s blog archive: Daily Posts

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56358949 1308494341961
56358949 1308494341961

The Adoption of 2nd LT Eino E. Jarvi, 8th Air Force

The weather was listed as CAVU: Ceiling Absolute, Visibility Unlimited on December 31, 1944.  B-17 tail #43-38247, with no nickname of record, got in line to take off, along with hundreds of other heavy bombers. The crew, along with pilot 2nd LT Walter Monit, set off from Framlingham, England, for the day’s target: the German city of Hamburg. The crew’s navigator, 2nd Lieutenant E. Jarvi, was from a Finnish family that had settled on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to work in the area’s...
P 38 Lightning
P 38 Lightning
P 38 Lightning
P 38 Lightning
P 38 Lightning
P 38 Lightning
P 38 Lightning

Fighter Sweep to Meiktila

Twenty P-38 Lightning’s of the 459th Fighter Squadron left their base at Chittagong (present-day Bangladesh) for a fighter sweep against Japanese Army positions in Meiktila, Burma (Myanmar) on June 6, 1944.  Two of the American fighters were downed. Second Lieutenant William C. Baumeister, Jr., reported that he talked to one of the missing, Captain Walter F. Duke, on “several occasions” during the mission via radio: Lieutenant Baumeister also witnessed the plane piloted by 1st...
AAAREdmundLorenz 8.1 Crash Site
AAAREdmundLorenz 8.1 Crash Site
AAAREdmundLorenz 8.1 Crash Site
AAAREdmundLorenz 8.1 Crash Site

Nature of Accident: Undetermined

This is the first in a series of posts about the downed American flyers of June 6, 1944.  While this date is justifiably renowned for D-Day and the Allied storming of the beaches of Normandy, France, the war raged around the globe.  These posts will be world-wide in scope, from crashes which occurred in the United States, to all other theaters of the war. On June 8, 1944, Mr. Jesse B. Eakin, a New Mexico rancher, made the following statement to an Air Corps Investigation Officer: “At...
Patchwork By Bagting

The Almost Found Cities of America

by Bill Beigel The almost found cities of America Decker-Buffalo-Deer Creek-Cutler- Moran-Killmore-Cyclone-Thornhope-Walnut- Tetersburg-Star City-Freeland Park   What is this fabric What is this quilt that our mothers and fathers have woven Over the fields and woods and prairie Now made highways and farms and corner stores and old war monuments   Curtisville-Waymansville-Vernon-Vevay A way of life, a way of hearing the wind That is not so changed...
Ucla Royce Quad 1940s Lrg
Ucla Royce Quad 1940s Lrg
Ucla Royce Quad 1940s Lrg
Ucla Royce Quad 1940s Lrg
Ucla Royce Quad 1940s Lrg
Ucla Royce Quad 1940s Lrg
Ucla Royce Quad 1940s Lrg
Ucla Royce Quad 1940s Lrg

The World War II Dead of University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA)

More than 260 UCLA students, faculty  and alumni were killed in World War II; only Harvard University suffered more casualties.  As a two-time graduate of UCLA, I was honored to research every one of their stories in order to memorialize their sacrifices, their humanity, and their often heroic last acts. A summary of how and where they died provides a snapshot of the American military experience in World War II. My files consist of many hundreds of pages of military service records,...
ArthurThomasParker 12

“Character Excellent”

Arthur Thomas Parker had a short career in the Marine Corps.  Due to his age (he was born in Texas on November 11, 1924), he needed his father to sign a permission form for him to enlist.  His father, Willis M. Parker, signed the consent document December 26, 1941, three weeks after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  Unlike many of his fellow Marines, Parker was a high school graduate, and had completed one semester in college.  Under the “hobbies” section of his enlistment form, he...